Drew Storen deserves nothing more than your icy indifference 

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Nationals fans are notoriously polite. Struggling players don’t get booed. Opposing ones rarely get heckled. It seems like any Nats starter who makes it past the 5th inning gets a standing ovation–an absurd tradition if you ask me, but I’ll gladly err on the side of politeness and tact. Nobody wants to be Philly fans, who routinely embarrass themselves with crass behavior.

The only opposing player who routinely gets booed is Pete Kozma, but that’s almost done in a wink-wink joking kind of way. I doubt anyone actually carries real animosity towards a marginal player like Pete Kozma…which leads us to the player on the other side of Kozma’s notorious hit in the 2012 playoffs–Drew Storen.

Storen returns to town this weekend with the Cincinnati Reds and he’ll likely be cheered by Nats fans who don’t know any better. He’ll be booed by a few too. Most won’t react in any way.

Boo if you want. If you’re not a booer, that’s fine. Just don’t cheer, because no one who has ever worn the Nationals uniform deserves it less.

Of the five worst moments in Nationals history, Drew Storen is personally responsible for at least four of them. His 9th inning meltdown in Game 5 of the 2012 NLDS is undoubtedly the worst moment in modern franchise history and it’s a direct result of Storen not doing his job. In you can stomach it, go back and watch a replay of that game. Storen blew the save because he lost confidence in his stuff. He started nibbling. Like so many of his greatest failures, it was a mental breakdown rather than a physical one.

But it’s not because of the blown save Storen deserves your enmity–it’s his attitude in the face of failure. After being replaced as closer in the 2012-13 offseason, Storen chose not to embrace his new role and instead pouted for a significant portion of the 2013 season. He was so unusable as a pitcher the team was forced to send him the minors. The Nats missed the playoffs that year, in case you forgot.

Storen temporarily rebounded and began the 2014 playoffs as the team’s closer. He blew his chance again in Game 2, ruining Jordan Zimmermann’s masterpiece.

Storen was again effective during the first half of the 2015 season, but the team still needed bullpen help to hold off the surging, then-second place Mets. After surveying all his limited available options, Mike Rizzo chose to trade for Jonathan Papelbon and move Storen to the setup role, where he could have been very valuable. Storen should have embraced his role for the good of the team. They needed him. Again, Storen chose not to embrace his new job, and instead demanded a trade the Nationals couldn’t afford to make. And again, Storen let his disappointment affect his performance on the field. In the season’s most critical series against the Mets, Storen melted down. In a save situation, he started missing the catcher’s glove by feet, not inches. It was remarkable to watch. The next night he grooved a game-winning home run to Yoenis Cespdeses, effectively ending the Nats season.

This is not a track record Nats fans should salute. Storen’s on-field failures can be forgiven; his quitting on the team in a pennant race cannot. There have been plenty of model citizens and teamplayers who’ve come and gone who deserve your respect and should be thanked and recognized when they return to town–Ian Desmond and Jordan Zimmerman to name a few. Storen is not on that list. His priority was not the team’s success and, by extension, the fans, who deserve a winner after so many decades in the baseball wilderness.

If you want to remember Drew Storen, remember the last time he wore a Nats uniform–slamming his locker in frustration, breaking his thumb and prematurely ending his season. Remember his last action as a Nat–an immature, entitled, and selfish one that materially hurt the team. Stand and cheer Storen if you want, but if you do, that’s what your cheering for.

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